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Charlotte & Matt

SAMRONG CHILDREN'S FARM

Samrong Farm is a great place for children to grow in self-confidence, skills and education. In February 2015 we had the chance to become part of the Samrong family and spent 2 weeks living with and teaching the children to whom this is their home. The children there are fun loving and positive individuals who love to welcome visitors. On our first day at Samrong we didn't really know what to expect, however we were welcomed straight away and we were able to get stuck in, helping the children with their daily routines of watering the gardens. The children at Samrong are very sociable and enjoyed finding out about our lives and telling us about theirs.

Read more: Charlotte & Matt

 

Annika Tombleson

For four young travellers, our excitement and fascination was hard to contain when we first set foot in Phnom Penh. Despite a long plane trip and very few hours sleep, we couldn't help but explore the city before taking a rest. On our first day there, we ventured out on a boat trip which exposed us to the lives of the river people. Juxtaposed above this sea of boats, were grand mansions, exemplifying the diversity within Cambodia. This was our first sight of both the wealth and poverty that existed in this vibrant country. The markets we visited were bustling, singing with barterers and the smells were overwhelming. The experience was one which is unforgettable.

Read more: Annika Tombleson

 

Emma Lloyd

When a child calls you “mama” you know you have made a difference.

My name is Emma and I am a British female teacher. I live in Perth, Western Australia. 
Choosing to volunteer at Samrong Farm is a decision that I will never regret and I look forward to going back. Below is my story.

Read more: Emma Lloyd

 

Ollie Smallwood, from England

Leaving our hostel in the centre of Phnom Penh we climb inside our compact tuk tuk cabin attached to the back of Kiwi's motorbike; bottle of water in one hand and surgeon-style mask in the other we set off on our 45 minute commute.
The morning rush hour in Phnom Penh is congested and chaotic (a metaphor for life in Cambodia's capital city): The 4x4 Lexus sit at the top of the food chain bullying the other vehicles in much the same way as their passengers, shielded behind dark glass, rule the country. Barely roadworthy, trucks used to transport building materials stir up a concoction of black fumes and dust, to be inhaled by the majority. Motorbikes provide family transport: two or three kids sandwiched between parents. Tuk-Tuks and bicycles weave in all directions. With no traffic lights, and few junctions or roundabouts to order the flow of vehicles, progress relies on opportunism and trust.
Kiwi nervelessly steers our path to the other side of the city and onto the dusty highway, masks and sun shades firmly in place to protect our eyes and lungs. A mixture of concrete buildings and huts exist along the side of the road amongst a sea of rubbish. The inhabitants often smile and wave as we pass by.

Read more: Ollie Smallwood, from England

   

Rudi Young and Catherine Neal, from Japan

A short account of an unforgettable two weeks volunteering at the Orphan Children Farm Samrong ("the Farm") ...
August 2009, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Choked streets, weaving tuk–tuks, noise, pollution, busy pavements, market stalls, new smells, the occasional glimpse of an orange robed monk. Wow, this is different!
At first we were a little thrown by this incredibly vibrant environment, but over the next few days gradually adjusted to the way of life in Cambodia's capital city. That said when we learned at our orientation meeting that we had been placed at the Farm we were really excited at the prospect of getting out of the busy city and working in the countryside (we applied for volunteer work through a UK company and could have been allocated to a number of different volunteer programs in Phnom Penh).

Read more: Rudi Young and Catherine Neal, from Japan

   

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ANNUAL REPORT 2016

The English version of the Annual Report 2016 as prepared by our secretary is now downloadable from this site
Download the annual 2016 here 

Please enjoy reading this document which highlights all major activities of CCSF and WWCF throughout the year. And there are lots of pictures also!

The financials are also included.